Is Navigation in Cars Making Us Stupid?

Is Navigation in Cars Making Us Stupid?

Today the younger generation is more prone to using gadgets and following maps. As a result, statistics show that they are often misdirected, about 6.3 times on average. Hence, many wonder whether technological crutches such as GPS are making people worse drivers, even stupid. Most of us are getting used to navigational systems to get to different places, forgetting our own ability of spatial awareness or common sense.

Navigation in cars has been well established for years, but where is the innovation?

This article explores how navigation may change in the future by looking at how casinos have successfully navigated their way through these changes.

Casinos provide a good example of how to make changes to an industry that are met with success and adaptive while operating at a scale that is commensurate with the developments.

Casinos do this by creating a framework for their customers within which they operate in. They create rules that guide players on what to expect from the game experience and what they can expect from each other as players of the game. These frameworks enable the casinos to make changes, not on an individual level but on a structural level, that enables them to adapt quickly and effectively. Casinos should be seen as flexible organizations with an open mind that is able to take the lead at every moment, which is what they are known for doing.

Like GPS, the internet or search engines are more intuitive in understanding what people are looking for. For instance, if you are looking to spend leisure time playing games, online search options will show casino games as well. Indeed, today the online gambling industry is expanding in popularity. As a result, you will come across a 7s Wild slot at a casino of your choice, which you can try with real money or free bonuses as well.

Origin of GPS

Most of us have been using GPS for a long time now, a technology that was initially invented as a radio navigation system by the US, used by the Air Force initially. The first satellite for the same was launched in 1978. Today about 30 satellites orbit and keep the GPS system alive for the earth. The first computerized software for GPS navigation was created in the late eighties. It is now a common feature in most new car models. Though benefits are evident, the easy availability of this technology probably makes people over-dependent on it.

Effects of Too Much Dependence on GPS

Lack of Navigation Skills

Many neuropsychologists state that, for people of the younger generation, who have learnt to follow electronic maps and apps on their phones, navigation skills or instincts that develop naturally are not formed. Hence, many would be unable to form a mental picture or cognitive map of the surroundings, especially those who grow up looking at map apps from a young age.

Many neuropsychologists state that, for people of the younger generation, who have learnt to follow electronic maps and apps on their phones, navigation skills or instincts that develop naturally are not formed. Hence, many would be unable to form a mental picture or cognitive map of the surroundings, especially those who grow up looking at map apps from a young age.

Impeded Learning

Surveys done show that about 1.5 million motorists often veer in traffic suddenly, which is as per GPS instructions. They do not take notice of cars around them or of road conditions. In such ways, about 300,000 drivers have faced accidents. They have also become too dependent, using GPS even on familiar routes. For such reasons, they often get lost in case the electronic guide has been left at home or their smartphone is out of charge. It is often true even if they make the same trip several times over a week. Following a GPS prevents the human brain from learning intuitively. Also, it is harder to remember the step-by-step instructions that the navigation system provides.

Experts state that brain functions in the prefrontal cortex, as well as the hippocampus, are negatively impacted by the aid of such software programs. The functions in our brain that are related to learning spatial orientation, geography and other cognitive functions are often inhibited in their development due to the overuse of technology-assisted programs.

Arrested Brain Development

Many researchers have been looking into the effect of satellite navigation systems on our natural ability to drive and navigate our surroundings. For many people, technology disrupts certain brain functions. Due to GPS dependence, people often remember less about where they were going and work less to remember the location or how to get there. Motorists who use paper maps or stop to ask locals for directions are using their brains more. When there is a soothing voice that tells us where to turn or when to go straight, the brain often stops putting in cognitive efforts for remembering directions manually.

Interesting Finds

Studies that look into finding whether GPS systems are making us stupid have made interesting finds. For instance, Scientific American has found that taxi drivers in London who have memorized the 25000 streets around town have a larger hippocampus than others. This translates to bigger brains because they put their brains to work in remembering roads and signs that help them navigate manually.

Maintaining a Balance

So, what should the solution be? Ideally, places that we are familiar with or can figure out easily by asking directions, it is best to do such navigations using our own senses. That way, you increase the alertness of the mind. In case you are new to a city or are taking a long trip in unknown territory, the app works as a saviour. Hence, it cannot be disregarded completely. It has helped many cab services to run, and many are able to provide driver assistance due to the availability of the driving apps, also in different languages. However, over-dependence is not good for the brain, and young people should be taught to depend more on their intuitive navigation skills, encouraged to remember places or directions manually. This should be a practice for all those who travel the same route to school or work every day.