Lori Loughlin’s trial still set for October despite coronavirus outbreak, judge says

Lori Loughlin won’t catch a break from the coronavirus outbreak.

The actress’ trial date remains scheduled for October despite the viral pandemic, per an order issued by a federal judge on Tuesday.

Federal courts in Boston, Springfield and Worcester continue to be operational, and criminal case pre-trial dates have been extended for 60 days.

“This judicial officer hereby determines that all established pre-trial deadlines in the above-captioned case continue to apply,” said Judge Nathaniel Gorton’s brief order, obtained by the Boston Herald. “Any motion for an extension of time will be considered on an individualized basis and granted only for good cause shown.”

Lori Loughlin and her daughter Olivia Jade. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Lori Loughlin and her daughter Olivia Jade. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli face charges in the college admissions scandal, after allegedly offering money to the University of Southern California in order to obtain guaranteed admission for their daughters.

Gorton said that keeping the trial in place and coming to a conclusion quickly is in the best interest of Loughlin, Giannulli, “the public at-large and the criminal justice system generally.”

Loughlin’s attorney declined to comment when reached by Fox News.

Earlier this month, the case’s judge accused USC of favoring influential students.

Actress Lori Loughlin arrives at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.

Actress Lori Loughlin arrives at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.
(AP Photo/Steven Senne)

It was reported that the judge ordered USC to turn over unredacted documents in the college admissions scandal in the hopes of showing that the university has a habit of favoring admission to students with influence.

The judge argues that the university has been misleading the court by redacting information that points to its use of a “side-door” for people with money and power.

The outlet reports the judge was spurred on after seeing unredacted emails that “directly contradict” the prosecutors’ claim that the university does not offer special treatment.

Loughlin and Giannulli’s defense, meanwhile, has been arguing that the couple was unaware the money they were giving to scam mastermind William “Rick” Singer did not go directly to USC as donations, but rather personal bribes to key officials.

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